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UST regains UAAP poomsae title in convincing fashion

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[nextpage title = “Recap”]
The crown is back in España.

The former two-time champions University of Santo Tomas reclaimed the UAAP poomsae championship after besting five other schools with three golds and one silver medal, Wednesday at the Blue Eagle Gym.

Last year’s winners University of the Philippines finished second with one gold, one silver, and three bronze medals, while De La Salle University placed third after coming up a bronze medal short of UP. Far Eastern University bagged two silvers to remain in fourth.

DLSU started the day on a high note when Rinna Babanto successfully defended her individual female crown with an 8.320 mark in the finals. Juvenile Crisostomo registered the silver for FEU at 8.235, while UP rookie Patricia Jubelag finished third at 7.935. Babanto and Crisostomo earlier topped the preliminaries with identical 8.135 scores, but the La Sallian raised the bar in the medal rounds to pull through against her opponent.

In the individual male category, UP veteran Dustin Mella showed his fine form and technical skills to claim the gold with a whopping 8.435 mark. His national team colleague, Junior Reyes from UST, placed a distant second at 8.280, while DLSU’s McAvyngyr Alob took the bronze at 8.220. The Maroon tallied an 8.40 as well in the preliminaries to end up with 8.370.

From there, UST took control and blazed their way into the crown. Veterans Marvin Gabriel and Jo Ninobla reclaimed their mixed pair gold after fending off a strong challenge from DLSU and scoring 8.365. National team members Enrico Mella and Babanto finished at a close second for the Green Jins with 8.330 to get the silver, while UP’s Nikki Oliva and Jayboy Buenavista snared the bronze at 7.970.

Ninobla then teamed up with Raica Libiran and Jhoanna Razon to top the female team category with 8.165 for the Tigresses. FEU snared their second silver courtesy of Nicole Land, Winlou Dela Cerna, and Charisse Gasmin at 8.015. The trio of Oliva, Jubelag, and Chanisse Dabalus took the bronze with 7.885. UST earlier finished first after the qualifiers with 8.105 with FEU following them closely at 8.050.

With title number 3 virtually in the bag, Gabriel, along with Adrian Ang and Jerel Dalida, sealed the deal for the Tiger Jins with an 8.270 finish in the finals. The Maroon triumvirate of Dustin Mella, Lyan Llanto, and Roman Sta. Romana snuck past DLSU for second at 8.235. La Salle’s Enrico Mella, Alob, and Alfritz Arevalo settled for the bronze with 8.180. It was actually DLSU who topped the preliminaries with 8.280, but UST and UP turned it around in the finals.

UST Head Coach Rani Ortega attributes her team’s win to their hunger. She remarked, “I saw their hunger to get back the crown. They worked hard in training and they won it.” The national mainstay was happy with the results of the competition in general. Ortega was delighted that the results show that “[Filipino] poomsae is world-class.”

In the next pages, watch the performances of the jins as shot by Tiebreaker Times’ Mike Miguel

NEXT PAGE: Individual Male Competition >>

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[nextpage title = “Individual Male”]

First up is the Individual Male Category.

During the preliminary round, the jins performed the following forms:

Taegeuk 7 or Taegeuk Chil Jang

The trigram represented in this form is mountain. A mountain exemplifies indomitability and majesty but still carrying a serene imagery. The jin’s performance must exemplify beauty, hardness and serenity, just like a beautiful mountain.

Koryo

Koryo, or Goryeo, is the name of an old Korean dynasty that defeated the Mongolian invaders. The Goryeo spirit of strength and coordination must be represented by the jins in their performance.

Here are the jins who performed and the scores they tallied for the round: (by order of performance)

NAMESCHOOLTAEGEUK 7KORYOTOTALRANK
Rodolfo Reyes Jr.UST8.268.208.232
McAvyngyr AlobDLSU8.038.008.0153
Alfred AvilaNU7.507.407.456
Justin De LeonADMU7.767.667.715
Dustin Jacob MellaUP8.348.408.371
Mark Lorenz BalcitaFEU7.837.937.884

FOR VIDEOS OF THE PRELIMINARY PERFORMANCES GO TO Tiebreaker Times’ Youtube Link


Dustin Mella from UP, Rodolfo Reyes from UST, and McAvyngyr Alob from DLSU advanced to the finals and were asked to perform the following forms:

Pyongwon

Pyongwon is loosely defined as a stretch and vast plain. The form is based on the idea of peace and struggle stemming out from the principles of origin and use. The jins are required to concentrate their force in the lower abdomen, the source of human strength, as symbolized by the plain.

Dustin Mella’s Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.43

Rodolfo Reyes’ Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.43

McAvyngyr Alob’s Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.20

Keumgang

Keumgang is defined as a diamond. In addition, the mountain Keumgang, is the symbol of Korean national spirit. A Keumgang warrior is the mightiest of warriors as said by Buddha. The jin performing the keumgang must represent the hardness and beauty of a diamond and, as well as, the balance as represented by the keumgang warrior.

Dustin Mella’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.44

Rodolfo Reyes’ Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.13

McAvyngyr Alob’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.24

With an average of 8.435, Dustin Mella took home the first gold medal for the UP Fighting Maroons. Placing second was Rodolfo Reyes Jr. of UST with an average of 8.28 while McAvyngyr Alob took home bronze with a score of 8.22.

NEXT PAGE: Individual Female Competition >>

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[nextpage title = “Individual Female”]

Next up is the Individual Female Category.

During the preliminary round, the jins performed the following forms:

Taegeuk 7 or Taeguek Chil Jang

The trigram represented in this form is mountain. A mountain exemplifies indomitability and majesty but still carrying a serene imagery. The jin’s performance must exemplify beauty, hardness and serenity, just like a beautiful mountain.

Taegeuk 6 or Taegeuk Yuk Jang

The trigram represented in this form is water. Characteristics of water are incessant flow and softness. Thus, jins must display the flowing, powerful and cleansing characteristics of water.

Here are the jins who performed and the scores they tallied for the round: (by order of performance)

NAMESCHOOLTAEGEUK 6TAEGEUK 7TOTALRANK
Cyrinne Jazmine AbenirUST7.677.737.705
France Pauline AlarillaADMU7.907.837.8654
Juvenile Faye CrisostomoFEU8.178.108.1351
Rinna BabantoDLSU8.148.138.1352
Shiryl BadolNU7.567.467.516
Patricia JubelagUP7.907.977.9353

FOR VIDEOS OF THE PRELIMINARY PERFORMANCES GO TO Tiebreaker Times’ Youtube Link


Juvenile Faye Crisostomo from FEU, Rinna Babanto from DLSU, and Patricia Jubelag from UP advanced to the finals and were asked to perform the following forms:

Sipjin

In Korean folklore, there are 10 symbols for longevity: sun, moon, mountain, water, stone, pine tree, herb of eternal youth, turtle, deer and crane. All these symbols give man faith, hope and love. Sipjin represents the 10 symbols for longevity. This form represents the endless development and growth of a jin.

Juvenile Crisostomo’s Sipjin performance


SCORE: 8.27

Rinna Babanto’ Sipjin performance


SCORE: 8.30

Patricia Jubelag’s Sipjin performance


SCORE: 7.97

Taebaek

Taeback is defined as lightness. In Korean folklore, it is said that Dangun, the founder of the first Korean Kingdom, established the first Korean nation at Taeback, at the bottom of Korea’s great mountain Baekdoo. The jin’s performance must exemplify determination and hardness resembling the mountain Baekdoo.

Juvenile Crisostomo’s Taebaek performance


SCORE: 8.20

Rinna Babanto’ Taebaek performance


SCORE: 8.34

Patricia Jubelag’s Taebaek performance


SCORE: 7.90

With an average of 8.32, Rinna Babanto took home the first gold medal for the La Salle Green Jins. Juvenile Crisostomo fell to second with with a norm of 8.235 while Patricia Jubelag of UP took home bronze with a score of 7.935.

NEXT PAGE: Mixed Pair Competition >>

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The coed part of the competition is the mixed pair event.

During the preliminary round, the jins performed the following forms:

Koryo

Koryo, or Goryeo, is the name of an old Korean dynasty that defeated the Mongolian invaders. The Goryeo spirit of strength and coordination must be represented by the jins in their performance.

Taegeuk 8 or Taegeuk Pal Jang

The trigram represented in this form is earth. Moreover, it represents the yin in yin-yang. This is the last of the 8 taegeuk poomsaes. With all these in mind, it represents the beginning and the end, the root and the settlement. The jin must put emphasis on the accuracy of stepping and the difference between the jumping-over kick and the alternate jumping kick in the air.

Here are the jins who performed and the scores they tallied for the round: (by order of performance)

MALEFEMALESCHOOLKORYOTAEGEUK 8TOTALRANK
Jayboy BuenavistaJanna Dominique OlivaUP8.068.068.063
Vidal Marvin GabrielJocel Lyn NinoblaUST8.278.438.351
Alfred AvilaAngela Kim LorenNU7.537.367.4456
Sean Kevin SalcedoNouf MoralesFEU7.877.867.8655
Raphael Enrico MellaRinna BabantoDLSU8.308.148.222
Francis Aaron AgojoFrance Pauline AlarillaADMU7.977.977.974

FOR VIDEOS OF THE PRELIMINARY PERFORMANCES GO TO Tiebreaker Times’ Youtube Link


The top three pairs of Gabriel and Ninobla of UST, Mella and Babanto of La Salle, and Buenavista and Oliva of UP advanced to the finals and were asked to perform the following forms:

Pyongwon

Pyongwon is loosely defined as a stretch and vast plain. The form is based on the idea of peace and struggle stemming out from the principles of origin and use. The jins are required to concentrate their force in the lower abdomen, the source of human strength, as symbolized by the plain.

Vidal Gabriel and Jocelyn Ninobla’s Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.40

Raphael Mella and Rinna Babanto’s Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.30

Jayboy Buenavista and Janna Oliva’s Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.00

Keumgang

Keumgang is defined as a diamond. In addition, the mountain Keumgang, is the symbol of Korean national spirit. A Keumgang warrior is the mightiest of warriors as said by Buddha. The jin performing the keumgang must represent the hardness and beauty of a diamond and, as well as, the balance as represented by the keumgang warrior.

Vidal Gabriel and Jocelyn Ninobla’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.33

Raphael Mella and Rinna Babanto’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.36

Jayboy Buenavista and Janna Oliva’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 7.94

GOLD – Vidal Marvin Gabriel and Jocelyn Ninobla (UST) 8.365
SILVER – Raphael Mella and Rinna Babanto (DLSU) 8.33
BRONZE – Jayboy Buenavista and Janna Oliva (UP) 7.97

NEXT PAGE: Group Male Competition >>

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[nextpage title = “Group Male”]

The group events started with the men’s trios. FEU did not field a team for this event.

During the preliminary round, the jins performed the following forms:

Taegeuk 7 or Taeguek Chil Jang

The trigram represented in this form is mountain. A mountain exemplifies indomitability and majesty but still carrying a serene imagery. The jin’s performance must exemplify beauty, hardness and serenity, just like a beautiful mountain.

Taegeuk 6 or Taegeuk Yuk Jang

The trigram represented in this form is water. Characteristics of water are incessant flow and softness. Thus, jins must display the flowing, powerful and cleansing characteristics of water.

Here are the jins who performed and the scores they tallied for the round: (by order of performance)

MEMBERMEMBERMEMBERTEAMTAEGEUK 6TAEGEUK 7SCORERANK
Raphael MellaMcAvyngyr AlobAlfritz ArevaloDLSU8.238.338.281
Cyrilwill PerezGrant ElpedesJose Micro EspinosaFEU7.908.037.9654
Vidal GabrielAdrian Meynard AngJerel DalidaUST8.208.208.202
Justin De LeonMarc FrigillanaFrancis AgojoADMU7.937.867.8955
Dustin MellaLyan LlantoRoman Sta RomanoUP8.178.238.203

FOR VIDEOS OF THE PRELIMINARY PERFORMANCES GO TO Tiebreaker Times’ Youtube Link


The top three trios from La Salle, UST, and UP advanced to the finals and were asked to perform the following forms:

Pyongwon

Pyongwon is loosely defined as a stretch and vast plain. The form is based on the idea of peace and struggle stemming out from the principles of origin and use. The jins are required to concentrate their force in the lower abdomen, the source of human strength, as symbolized by the plain.

Mella, Alob, and Arevalo’s Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.06

Gabriel, Ang, and Dalida’s Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.30

Mella, Llanto, and Sta. Romana’s Pyongwon performance


SCORE: 8.17

Keumgang

Keumgang is defined as a diamond. In addition, the mountain Keumgang, is the symbol of Korean national spirit. A Keumgang warrior is the mightiest of warriors as said by Buddha. The jin performing the keumgang must represent the hardness and beauty of a diamond and, as well as, the balance as represented by the keumgang warrior.

Mella, Alob, and Arevalo’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.30

Gabriel, Ang, and Dalida’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.24

Mella, Llanto, and Sta. Romana’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.30

GOLD – Vidal Gabriel, Adrian Ang, Jerel Dalida (UST) 8.27
SILVER – Dustin Mella, Lyan Llanto, Roman Sta. Romana (UP) 8.235
BRONZE – Raphael Mella, McAvyngyr Alob, Alfritz Arevalo (DLSU) 8.18

NEXT PAGE: Group Female Competition >>
[/nextpage]
[nextpage title = “Group Female”]

The tournament ended with the Team Female competition.

During the preliminary round, the jins performed the following forms:

Taegeuk 8 or Taegeuk Pal Jang

The trigram represented in this form is earth. Moreover, it represents the yin in yin-yang. This is the last of the 8 taegeuk poomsaes. With all these in mind, it represents the beginning and the end, the root and the settlement. The jin must put emphasis on the accuracy of stepping and the difference between the jumping-over kick and the alternate jumping kick in the air.

Taegeuk 7 or Taeguek Chil Jang

The trigram represented in this form is mountain. A mountain exemplifies indomitability and majesty but still carrying a serene imagery. The jin’s performance must exemplify beauty, hardness and serenity, just like a beautiful mountain.

Here are the jins who performed and the scores they tallied for the round: (by order of performance)

MEMBERMEMBERMEMBERTEAMTAEGEUK 8TAEGEUK 7SCORERANK
Jocel Lyn NinoblaRaisa LibiranJhoanna Lyde RazonUST8.078.148.1051
Angelica Joyce GawCheska Erfe MejiaKristi Anrose HernandezDLSU7.977.877.924
Crystal Faith HukomAngela Kim LorenShiryl BadolNU7.507.537.5156
Jana Dominique OlivaPatricia JubelagChannise DabalusUP7.948.007.973
Isabel Beatrice BautistaJana MoralesAdrienne Antoinette YuADMU7.567.737.6455
Leanarda Nicole LandritoWinlou Gean Dela CernaCharisse Jane GasminFEU8.008.108.052

FOR VIDEOS OF THE PRELIMINARY PERFORMANCES GO TO Tiebreaker Times’ Youtube Link


The top three groups from UST, FEU, and UP advanced to the finals and were asked to perform the following forms:

Sipjin

In Korean folklore, there are 10 symbols for longevity: sun, moon, mountain, water, stone, pine tree, herb of eternal youth, turtle, deer and crane. All these symbols give man faith, hope and love. Sipjin represents the 10 symbols for longevity. This form represents the endless development and growth of a jin.

Ninobla, Libiran, and Razon’s Sipjin performance


SCORE: 8.26

Oliva, Jubelag, and Dabalus’s Sipjin performance


SCORE: 8.07

Landrito, Cerna, and Gaspin’s Sipjin performance


SCORE: 8.17

Keumgang

Keumgang is defined as a diamond. In addition, the mountain Keumgang, is the symbol of Korean national spirit. A Keumgang warrior is the mightiest of warriors as said by Buddha. The jin performing the keumgang must represent the hardness and beauty of a diamond and, as well as, the balance as represented by the keumgang warrior.

Ninobla, Libiran, and Razon’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 8.07

Oliva, Jubelag, and Dabalus’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 7.70

Landrito, Cerna, and Gaspin’s Keumgang performance


SCORE: 7.86

GOLD – Jocel Lyn Ninobla, Raisa Libiran, Jhonna Razon (UST) 8.165
SILVER – Leanarda Landrito, Winlou Dela Cerna, Charisse Gasmin (FEU) 8.015
BRONZE – Janna Oliva, Patricia Jubelag, Chanisse Dabalus (UP) 7.885
[/nextpage]

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Grew to appreciate various sports from tennis to judo. True-maroon kiddo since the new millennium. Fanboy. Singer. Occasional sports writer.

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AU

Impervious Lady Chiefs stay perfect after sweep of Lady Pirates

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The Arellano University Lady Chiefs extended their winning streak to 17 dating back to last season, after clobbering the Lyceum of the Philippines Lady Pirates, 25-16, 25-17, 25-11, at the FilOil Flying V Centre.

The defending champions were unrelenting with four Lady Chiefs scoring in double-digits with rookie Necole Ebuen powering in 11 points. Third-year open hitter Regine Arocha and Arellano’s middle blockers Mary Anne Esguerra and Andrea Marzan each provided 10 markers.

Conversely, no Lady Pirate managed to score in double-figures.

“Maganda naman talaga ang nilalaro ng mga bata. Lahat kasi kami determinado na makakuha ulet ng championship. Alam nila (Lady Chiefs) na kailangan pataas nang pataas ang ginagalaw namin,” said Arellano head coach Obet Javier.

The Lady Chiefs also limited their errors to a season-best 16 while the Lady Pirates surrendered 24 miscues.

The Lady Chiefs look for their sixth win of the season when they face the red-hot University of Perpetual Help System DALTA (4-1) on Tuesday at the FilOil Flying V Centre.

Christine Miralles and Monica Sevilla each supplied the struggling Lyceum with eight point apiece.

The Lady Pirates (1-4) take on the undefeated San Beda College (4-0) on Wednesday also at the FilOil Flying V Centre.

The Scores

AU (3) – Ebuen 11, Arocha 10, Esguerra 10, Marzan 10, Prado 3, Ramirez 3, Liu 2, Balanoba 1, Donato 1, Verutiao 0, Buemia (L), Flores (L)

LPU (0) – Miralles 8, Sevilla 8, Juanilla 7, Patio 4, Genova 1, Romanban 0, Bongabong 0, Marcella (L)

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Basketball

Late whistle costs San Beda against Sousse to fall to 0-2

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23 for 2023 cadet Robert Bolick is averaging 27.5 points per game in the tournament

After struggling to close out the UAE National Team in their opener last Friday, the San Beda College Red Lions figured in a late judgment call that did not fall into their favor, Saturday at the Shabab Al Ahli Club in Dubai. Due to this, the defending NCAA Champions lost to Tuniasian club team Sousse, 78-79.

With the loss, the Red Lions fell to a 0-2 hole in the 29th Dubai Basketball Championship. But the record does not reflect how the Filipinos played.

Robert Bolick, who scored 28 points against the UAE National Team, led the charge for San Beda in their second outing had 27 points. Fellow 23 for 2023 cadet Javee Mocon added 11 points and seven rebounds.

Sousse, the second-best club team in Tunisia and boasts four national team players and an American import, led by as much as 10 points, 70-60 in the final frame.

Fired-up by the Filipinos who stormed the venue, the Red Lions answered right back with an 18-8 run capped by a booming Bolick triple with six ticks left to gain a 78-76 lead.

However, a foul was called on a Red Lion on a three-point attempt by a Sousse player. He calmly sank all three free throws with 1.5 seconds remaining to seal the win.

Donald Tankoua had eight points and 13 rebounds as he was saddled with foul trouble all throughout the game.

The Tunisian club team was paced by Radzhouane Slimane with 18 points while Ibrahim Nadarri and Joshua Cassady had 13 markers each.

San Beda will have a day break before taking on Moroccan club team Al Sale on Monday, January 22.

The Scores:

San Beda 78 – Bolick 27, Mocon 11, Tankoua 8, Noah 8, Toba 6, Soberano 6, Prebitero 4, Tongco 4, Bahio 2, Carino 2, Oftana 0, Adamos 0.

Sousse 79 – Slimane 18, Naddari 13, Cassady 13, Mouhli 11, Knioua 9, Toumi 8, Monastiri 4, Gaddour 3.

Quarterscores: 23-17, 36-39, 57-62, 78-79.

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JRU

Perpetual overpowers JRU to keep pace of Final Four

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Strutting their decisive height and power advantage, the University of Perpetual Help System DALTA Lady Altas slammed the Jose Rizal University Lady Bombers, 25-21, 22-25, 25-14, 25-21, at the FilOil Flying V Centre.

The Lady Altas were still heavy-handed with their errors, surrendering 35 miscues, including 12 in the second set, the only frame they lost.

The Las Piñas-based program, however, kept a scorching offensive pace, bombarding the Lady Bombers with six blocks and 12 aces. JRU had just five points combined crom those categories.

“Mataas pa talaga ‘yung tendency ng mga bata mamigay ng mga puntos. Sabi ko nga hindi kami mananalo kung tutulungan pa namin ‘yung kalaban maka-score,” rued Perpetual head coach Michael Cariño.

“Pero, unti-unte namang gumaganda ‘yung galaw ng mga bata. Lahat naman ng pagkukulang nila, tinatrabaho namin para maayos sa ensayo,” the champion mentor added.

Perpetual’s six-foot-three middle blocker Lourdes Clemente towered over the Lady Bombers with a season-high 19 points which included 14 attacks, two blocks, and three aces. Winger Cindy Imbo added 15 points.

The Lady Altas (4-1) take on the undefeated defending champs Arellano University (5-0) on Tuesday at the FilOil Flying V Centre.

Rookie Dolly Versoza paced the Lady Bombers with a game-high 21 points while captain Shola Alvarez managed 15.

The Lady Bombers (2-3) face the College of Saint Benilde (3-1) on Wednesday also at the FilOil Flying V Centre.

The Scores

UPHSD (3) – Clemente 19, Imbo 15, Sangalang 8, Llorente 7, Tripoli 7, Gual 6, Versoza 2, Umandal 1, Estanislao 0, Medalla (L)

JRU (1) – Versoza 21, Alvarez 15, Ebuenga 5, Montojo 2, Rivera 2, Sibangan 1, Bodiongan 0, Macaraya (L)

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Basketball

Marc Pingris wants Rafi Reavis to break Robert Jaworski’s record

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Marc Pingris was all praises for veteran Rafi Reavis Saturday night, as the 40-year-old center made his presence felt in the Magnolia Hotshots’ 97-91 victory — their third straight win — over Phoenix Fuel Masters at the Cuneta Astrodome.

The six-foot-nine Reavis finished with 11 points, 11 rebounds, and three blocks — a performance perfectly punctuated by a follow-up of a Paul Lee miss with 12.5 seconds left to play that knocked out the Fuel Masters for good.

“Papasalamat ako kay Rafi na talagang kababalik lang niya pero binigay niya talaga lahat,” said Pingris after the bout, as Saturday night was just Reavis’ second outing in the 2018 Philippine Cup after recovering from a hip injury.

“Nag-usap nga kami kanina e, hindi pa siya 100 percent. So bukas, ang sabi niya babalik daw siya sa gym dahil gusto niya ibalik yung lakas ng legs dahil wala pa daw,” added the 36-year-old, who also suffered a hip injury last season.

Reavis has been playing in the league for 16 years. Seeing the work he has put in, Pingris, who finished the game with 17 rebounds, four assists, four points and two blocks, believes that the 10-time PBA champion can play for 10 more years — at least.

“You know naman Rafi eh, katulad ko rin yan eh – rebound and depensa. At tsaka sobrang vocal siya sa team eh,” beamed Pingris, who himself is a 14-year veteran. “Walang siyang inaano, talagang sinasabihan niya kung sino yung mga nagmi-mistake, kung paano kami mag-adjust, so nakikinig naman lahat sa kanya.

“Talagang nandun yung respeto namin kay Rafi.”

And if Reavis stays healthy for the next decade, Pingris wants Reavis to exceed Jaworki’s 958 games played — third most all time.

“Nasa kanya yun, basta kaya mo ba eh. As a player, kung masipag ka naman at may disiplina sa sarili mo, kaya niya yun.”

Still, Reavis has a lot of catching up to do.

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